Friday, 17 February 2012

Two poems for Syria

We Are Al-Shabaab Soldiers 

we like to chase the mouse.

Weak and afraid and
much smaller than we;

it runs in the corners
so as to not be destroyed;

hungry, for we have cleared
what little grain there is--

-- -- After all, we are people
-- -- with a cause to feed.

Its pups that starve with
ever larger eyes and bellies,
are better filling the ground
than eating our corn
in their tiny nibbles.

Should they escape our door
we leave the granary

to hunt them down so that they
-- ----males, females, the young--
never return here.

God will not rid these pests
so we do it ourselves.

©   E R Olsen

Al-Shabaab bans Red Cross in Somalia
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 E R Olsen writes poetry and practices law in Nevada, in the U.S., where he lives with his wife and four children. His poems have appeared in several U.S. journals, most recently in Viking.

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How do I kill you?

after Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How do I kill you? Let me count the ways.
I kill you with variety of might
My army shall muster day and night
For the ends of putting you in your place.
I kill all of you and will every day
Till there will be no more persons to strike.
I kill you freely, as men strive to fight.
I kill you in your homes, in a true blaze.
I kill you with all passion I can use
In my position, with alawite faith.
I kill you with a thrill I cannot lose
By God, and I’ll kill you till my last breath,
Smile, last goal of my life; and if God choose,
I shall kill and hate you even more after death.

©  Lavinia Kumar

Syria: 'Civilians dying in droves' - at least 377 killed in Homs in recent days
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Lavinia Kumar lives in New Jersey. Her poetry has appeared in several publications, in the US and UK.  She writes a blog for her brother’s seniorsmagazine.org, based in Portsmouth, NH.

2 comments:

  1. The use of Barrett's famous love poem to express a hatred so deep the speaker hopes it out lasts life -- very powerful

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